According to the World Health Organisation, there has been a rise in the number of people affected by their mental health. From a record of 416 million in 1990, the number of individuals affected rose to 615 million in 2013. As of now, one in four adults in Britain will experience a diagnosable mental health problem. For this reason, more people are seeking professional help.

Psychotherapy is a form of therapy used to treat mental health conditions or emotional problems. It mainly involves talking but sometimes, it can be done through other forms like drama, art, music, and movement. When compared to Clinical Psychology or Psychiatry, a post graduate Psychotherapy Course does not require a degree in the related field. However, a Psychotherapy Course involves serious academic training when compared to Counselling, Psychotherapy deals with more complicated mental health issues that need more time to be resolved.

How does Psychotherapy work?

The main objective of Psychotherapy is to have a better understanding of the emotional or mental health problems that an individual is having. It helps in looking for different approaches to deal with these issues and it also aids in developing new ways to help a person cope with them.

Psychotherapy explores a person’s feelings about himself and other people, particularly those who are close to them like a significant other, a family or a friend. For this reason, it is necessary to build a trusting relationship between the Psychotherapist and the person looking for help and because of this Psychotherapy may last for several months or even years.

There are different types of Psychotherapy namely:

Psychodynamic (Psychoanalytic) Psychotherapy

In Psychoanalysis, the therapist encourages the individual to share his thoughts and feelings towards other people, discuss personal relationships, and explore past experiences. This will help the therapist determine the link between past events and the person’s current behaviour.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

This type of Psychotherapy determines how thoughts and beliefs affect a person’s feelings and behaviour. Psychotherapy allows an individual to develop different ways of thinking that are helpful when dealing with stressful situations.

Cognitive Analytical Therapy

Cognitive analytical therapy explores past experiences that might be affecting a person’s current behaviour and helps in determining changes that should be done to improve these behaviours.

Humanistic Therapies

Humanistic therapies come in different forms but all of them encourage a person to explore how he thinks about himself and realise his strengths. The main goal of Humanistic therapies is improving self-awareness.

Interpersonal Psychotherapy

This type of Psychotherapy determines how interpersonal relationships affect an individual’s emotional problems. This can help in developing new ways to approach problems with interpersonal relationships to improve mental and emotional problems.

Family and Couple (Systemic) Therapy

As the name suggests, this type of Psychotherapy involves all the members of the family and encourages them to work together in solving problems.

Therapists are required to go through intensive Psychotherapy training to master these methods to determine the appropriate type of Psychotherapy that should be used in handling emotional or mental health problems. If you want to further your career in counselling, look for the best Psychotherapy Course that will match your experience and help you increase your skills and knowledge.

The Chrysalis Professional Diploma in Psychotherapy Counselling Practice Course will provide you with the skills, experience, and knowledge necessary to gain higher qualifications. Contact us today to learn more about our Psychotherapy Course.

 

Tags: Psychotherapy, Other Therapy, Cognitive Analytical Therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, Interpersonal Psychotherapy, Cognitive Analytical Therapy, Family and Couple (Systemic) Therapy

https://thebeepingbell.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/mr_bean-e1489833633192.jpghttps://thebeepingbell.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/mr_bean-150x150.jpgRajat PandeyEducationAccording to the World Health Organisation, there has been a rise in the number of people affected by their mental health. From a record of 416 million in 1990, the number of individuals affected rose to 615 million in 2013. As of now, one in four adults in Britain...Sky is the limit !!